Enrico Riley

2018 Faculty Awardees Model ‘Dartmouth’s Highest Values’

Twelve professors received awards from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences this year.

Enrico Riley

Professor of Studio Art

John M. Manley Huntington Award for Newly Promoted Faculty

My current research interest revolves around the historical and contemporary implications of race and violence in the African American community, drawing on Judeo/Christian narratives as depicted visually in Medieval and early Renaissance Italian painting. I am passionate about my artistic practice because it allows me additional ways of existing in the world. I enjoy teaching simply because I am exposed to the endlessly diverse minds of students. All students are unique and have something to teach. Dartmouth is exceptional because of its students, faculty, staff, and geographic location.

Click here to read the full article at Dartmouth News

Kudos: Faculty, Students, and Staff Honored for Their Work

Kudos is an occasional column that recognizes Dartmouth faculty, students, and staff who have received awards or other honors.

Six members of the faculty have received inaugural New Directions in Humanities Scholarship and Arts Practice grants to pursue projects outside of their primary fields of expertise. The grants, administered by the Office of the Associate Dean for the Arts and Humanities, with funding from the Office of the President, are designed help faculty in the arts and humanities to push the boundaries of their disciplines and follow their intellectual curiosity. One of the awardees is the Department of Studio Art Chair, Associate Professor Enrico Riley. Professor Riley will use this grant to expand his artistic practice to digital modes, including animation, large-scale projection, and film for a collaboration with composer Jonathan Berger and Associate Professor of English Vievee Francis titled “Death by Drowning.”

Enrico Riley: Infinite Receptors

Enrico Riley: Infinite Receptors

Artist Talk: September 19 4:45 PM Loew Auditorium Reception to follow in the Jaffe-Friede Gallery - Click here to see the video of the lecture in our website.

 Sponsored by: Studio Art DepartmentIntended Audience(s): PublicCategories: Arts, Exhibitions, Lectures & Seminars  

Enrico Riley - Prescient Habits and Cinque Mostre 2017

Associate Professor Enrico Riley will participate in two shows this month:

"First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you're inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won't. Habit is persistence in practice."
—Octavia Butler

Mostly we don't know what we're doing—we respond, we seek, we dig in shit. We glean broken roots from history, we bounce off things, something starts to grow, to happen, ends up nowhere or with a different punch line than our intentions, a different arch, or none at all. But if we follow, build associations out of the wreckage, test the prescient cues of our inquiries, we find our work, the discipline here being work, the habit of investigation.

Prescient Habits is a show of five people who use drawing to build Prescient Habits.

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Associate Professor Enrico Riley to exhibit at SACI Florence

Enrico Riley will present his work, Infinite Receptors, at the SACI Gallery in Florence February 9 – March 2, 2017. This exhibition of drawings is sponsored by the American Academy of Rome where Enrico is currently a Rome Prize Fellow. There will be a presentation and opening on February 9 at 6:00pm. For more information about the exhibition please visit the SACI website:

http://www.saci-florence.edu/exhibition_details.php?id=249

Enrico Riley '95 Wins Rome Prize

(Originally published in Dartmouth Now May 09, 2016 by Hannah Silverstein, MALS '09)

Associate Professor of Studio Art Enrico Riley ’95 has won a 2016 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

Given annually to about 30 exceptional emerging artists and scholars from around the United States, the Rome Prize will provide studio space, lodging, and a stipend to allow Riley to spend close to a year living—and painting—in the Italian capital.

“The Rome Prize is a huge honor for Professor Riley,” says Barbara Will, associate dean for the arts and humanities. “It is a once-in-a-lifetime achievement, and a shining testament to his national and international reputation as a painter. We are thrilled to be able to share in his success.”